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Tuesday, September 28, 2010

WIZARD OF OZ EXHIBIT AT THE CHILDRENS MUSEUM OF MANHATTAN

Children's Museum of Manhattan


Tuesday, September 28, 2010

Last updated: Tuesday September 28, 2010, 11:10 AM

BY JENNIFER V. HUGHES

The Record

SPECIAL TO THE RECORD

WHAT: "The Wizard of Oz" exhibit at the Children's Museum of Manhattan.

WHEN: Through Jan. 9, the museum is open Tuesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

WHERE: The Tisch Building, 212 W. 83rd St., Manhattan; cmom.org or 212-721-1223 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting 212-721-1223 end_of_the_skype_highlighting.

HOW MUCH: Children over 12 months and adults, $10 each; seniors, $7.

The Children's Museum of Manhattan has a hands-on exhibit featuring characters and regions from Oz.

Just like Dorothy, children can step into the wonderful world of Oz when they visit the Children's Museum of Manhattan's newest exhibit.

"The Wizard of Oz" has been a childhood favorite since the book by L. Frank Baum was published in 1900, and even more so since the 1939 classic film. The exhibit, which originated from the Miami Children's Museum, opens this weekend at the New York City children's museum.

Karen Snider, deputy director for exhibitions at the museum, said the film makes for a perfect children's exhibit for many reasons.

"This is so rich for an exhibition because the messages and visuals are so strong," Snider said. The Oz story resonates with children and adults because it's a "journey of childhood and of life," she said.

"I think it really underlines the importance of home and family and friends and how they guide and support every child's journey," Snider said.

"It also has other big messages: What we need is really inside of us all along," she said, referring to how the Cowardly Lion learns he was brave from the start, the Scarecrow realized he always had brains and the Tin Man always had a heart.

"We can help our kids nurture the skills they need to draw upon their own strength that they already have," Snider said.

Beyond the deeper messages, however, Snider said the exhibit is just plain fun, featuring elements to engage children intellectually and physically as they visit all the places from the film.

At the Gale family farm, children can reach into small cubbies to try to feel a farm animal and guess what kind of creature it is by touch. At another part, visitors can create a hand-powered tornado and learn about the science behind the storms. Professor Marvel's wagon features optical illusions. In Munchkinland, children can make music by striking colorful flower-shaped pipes and create Munchkin clothing with giant paper dolls.

At another part of the exhibit, children can climb a cargo net to reach the top of the Wicked Witch of the West's castle and slide down to escape. At another part, children can build a rainbow with giant foam blocks.

"What's great about this exhibit is that it's a great story and it connects with people on an emotional level," Snider said. "The activities in the exhibit really address the whole child."

WHAT: "The Wizard of Oz" exhibit at the Children's Museum of Manhattan.



WHEN: Through Jan. 9, the museum is open Tuesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.



WHERE: The Tisch Building, 212 W. 83rd St., Manhattan; cmom.org or 212-721-1223 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting 212-721-1223 end_of_the_skype_highlighting.



HOW MUCH: Children over 12 months and adults, $10 each; seniors, $7.



The Children's Museum of Manhattan has a hands-on exhibit featuring characters and regions from Oz.



Bring the bunch along

Along with "The Wizard of Oz" exhibit, there are many special events for families. For a full calendar, go to cmom.org. Here are a few examples:



* Oct. 14 at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m.



Make a scarecrow stick puppet with raffia and other materials. Ages 4 and under.



* Oct. 24 at 3 and 4 p.m.



Make a costume element from the movie with Broadway costume maker Nick Godlee. Ages 5 and up.



* Dec. 5 at 3 p.m.



"Over the Rainbow and How They Got There: Special Effects and The Wizard of Oz." Oz historian John Fricke takes you behind the scenes with fun facts about special effects from the movie.



* Jan. 2 and 9 at noon, 2, 3 and 4 p.m.



Decorate a sash with badges of courage, for the Cowardly Lion, love, for the Tin Woodsman and wisdom, for the Scarecrow. Ages 5 and up.

Just like Dorothy, children can step into the wonderful world of Oz when they visit the Children's Museum of Manhattan's newest exhibit.



"The Wizard of Oz" has been a childhood favorite since the book by L. Frank Baum was published in 1900, and even more so since the 1939 classic film. The exhibit, which originated from the Miami Children's Museum, opens this weekend at the New York City children's museum.



Karen Snider, deputy director for exhibitions at the museum, said the film makes for a perfect children's exhibit for many reasons.



"This is so rich for an exhibition because the messages and visuals are so strong," Snider said. The Oz story resonates with children and adults because it's a "journey of childhood and of life," she said.



"I think it really underlines the importance of home and family and friends and how they guide and support every child's journey," Snider said.



"It also has other big messages: What we need is really inside of us all along," she said, referring to how the Cowardly Lion learns he was brave from the start, the Scarecrow realized he always had brains and the Tin Man always had a heart.



"We can help our kids nurture the skills they need to draw upon their own strength that they already have," Snider said.



Beyond the deeper messages, however, Snider said the exhibit is just plain fun, featuring elements to engage children intellectually and physically as they visit all the places from the film.



At the Gale family farm, children can reach into small cubbies to try to feel a farm animal and guess what kind of creature it is by touch. At another part, visitors can create a hand-powered tornado and learn about the science behind the storms. Professor Marvel's wagon features optical illusions. In Munchkinland, children can make music by striking colorful flower-shaped pipes and create Munchkin clothing with giant paper dolls.



At another part of the exhibit, children can climb a cargo net to reach the top of the Wicked Witch of the West's castle and slide down to escape. At another part, children can build a rainbow with giant foam blocks.



"What's great about this exhibit is that it's a great story and it connects with people on an emotional level," Snider said. "The activities in the exhibit really address the whole child."

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